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Slave Ships: La Amistad Books LLC

Slave Ships: La Amistad

Books LLC

Published May 31st 2010
ISBN : 9781156250310
Paperback
46 pages
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 About the Book 

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: La Amistad (Spanish: Friendship) was a ship notable as theMorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: La Amistad (Spanish: Friendship) was a ship notable as the scene of a revolt by African captives being transported from Havana to Puerto Principe, Cuba. It was a 19th-century two-masted schooner built in the United States, but owned by a Spaniard living in Cuba. The Africans took control of the ship in July 1839 and were captured off the coast of Long Island by the USS Washington of the United States Revenue Cutter Service. La Amistad became a symbol in the movement to abolish slavery. The ship was taken under control by the United States, resulting in a US Supreme Court case (1841) over the status of the Africans, as importation of slaves into the US had been prohibited since 1808. 1840 engraving depicting the Amistad revolt. On July 2, 1839, Sengbe Pieh (later known in the United States as Joseph Cinqu) led 56 fellow Africans (52 adults and 4 children), the captives being transported aboard La Amistad from Havana, in a revolt against their captors. In the main hold below decks, the captives found a rusty file. The captives freed themselves, and they quickly ascended the stairs to deck. Armed with machete-like cane knives, they were successful in gaining control of the ship and demanded to be returned home. The ships navigator, Don Pedro Montez, deceived them about which direction their course was on and sailed the ship north along the North American coast to the eastern tip of Long Island, New York. The United States Revenue Cutter Service discovered the schooner and took it and its occupants into custody. They took the Africans to Connecticut to be sold as slaves. A widely publicized court case ensued in New Haven, Connecticut, about the ship and the legal status of the African captives, which became a cause clbre among abolitionist... More: http://booksllc.net/?id=4533817